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CGB Hall of Fame Final Round! (12) Desmond Bishop vs. (7) Anthony Ervin

We've reached the final round of the Pappy Waldorf region and today's winner earns a spot in the CGB Hall of Fame. Desmond Bishop has earned an upset in every round of the Hall of Fame so far. Can he score one more upset to guarantee a spot in the Hall of Fame?

Matt Ludtke

(12) Desmond Bishop

Cal vs. Washington 2006 Bishop seals the victory (via HairOfTheBear)

People remember Marshawn owning things on the offensive end in that UW game, but they might forget that Bishop was a one man wrecking crew on D (16 tackles and the game clinching INT).

Throughout 2006 he was our defensive leader, and we certainly missed that fire in 2007.

Twist weighs in:

The Fiery Emotional and Vocally Inspiring Leader - this type of leader is emotional. He'll also have big time emotional celebrations after a big play, inspiring his teammates with confidence and energy. But what makes this type of leader different from the Fiery Emotional Cocky Leader is his ability to emotionally pick up his players. He's the one prowling the benches, screaming, and inspiring his teammates with words and speeches to find the heart within them to play harder and not quit. An example of this type of leader from last year's team would be Desmond Bishop.

As a senior in 2006, he became the first Bear in 13 years to lead the league in tackles with 126 and was named 1st-Team All-Pac-10. He had a knack for the big play - whether it was key stop, forced fumble, or game-clinching interception.

Questions about his speed caused him to drop to the 6th round, but his work ethic and determination quickly earned him the nod over more touted prospects when Green Bay's starters became injured. Already famous for his creative and entertaining twitter persona, http://twitter.com/#!/desbishop55, he backed up his words with solid play throughout the playoffs and in this year's Super Bowl victory.

(7) Anthony Ervin

Anthony Ervin (California) (via SwimmingWorldSPI)

LEastCoastBears gives us tons of good info from the Calympics post on Anythony:

The feel good story of the US Swim trial, Anthony Ervin is again an Olympian. After winning a gold medal in the 50 freestyle at the 2000 Olympics, Tony (his preferred name to friends) retired in 2003 (after the end of his Cal career) when he was 22 years old to explore "other interests".

After joining a rock band in New York and various other youthful exploits (that some articles try to make a bigger deal than others), he eventually found himself teaching swimming to kids in both New York City and Oakland. Last year he began training again, and qualified for London by finishing second in the 50 free (by narrowly edging out fellow Cal bear, Nathan Adrian). Between his colorful sleeve tattoos and a more slender body type, Anthony stands out in the pool.

Also of note, Anthony auctioned off his 2000 Olympic gold medal on eBay to aid survivors of the 2004 tsunami. Anthony did eventual finish his Cal degree in English in 2010 and is now currently in the Cal graduate program for sport, culture and education.

  • Event: 50 freestyle
  • 2nd time Olympian (In Sydney 2000 Olympics won gold in 50 Free and silver in 4x100 Free relay)
  • Cal career: 1999-2002
  • A great sentimental comeback story (which NBC will surely milk in the Olympics), Anthony won a gold back in 2000 and proceed to take almost a decade off from swimming. After teaching kids to swim an year ago, Ervin decided to make a comeback and was able to finish second in 50 Free (narrowly edging out Nathan Adrian by 8/100th of a second).

Anthony's slightly different training method/mentality is nicely explained in this USA Swimming article here. Interestingly, the article also conjectured about the success of Cal swimming:

Cal Swimming has long been at the forefront of alternative training approaches. Which could explain why they are – and have been -- so successful. Their two most individualistic and strongest personalities, Ervin and 29-year-old Natalie Coughlin, are also two of the sports most inventive, innovative thinkers. They tinker. They ask. They learn. They reflect. It’s no secret they both are still involved in the sport at an age once considered "ancient."

Read more about Anthony in this SFGate article here.

Grantland has the following interesting short blurb about him:

Enigmatic 31-year-old who won gold and silver in Sydney, retired from swimming in 2003 at age 22, and sold his gold medal to raise money for the Indian Ocean tsunami relief. (Lost his silver medal during his notoriously nomadic travels.) Returned to competition last year. Has such poor eyesight that a competitor had to tell him he had qualified; when Brendan Hansen congratulated him afterward he squinted and responded, "Who is that?" Speaks in full paragraphs, but also says things like "I just want to keep this fun train chugging."